Art Jobs | Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Lewis deSoto: Paranirvana (Self-Portrait): April 17 – July 31, 2016

Share

Country:

Works by Lewis deSoto are informed by the artist’s longstanding interest in anthropology, history, mythology, and religion. Proficient in a variety of media, deSoto is recognized for his photography, sculpture, and mixed media installations that incorporate video, sound, and performance. Paranirvana (Self-Portrait) (2015) is the most recent work in a series of oversize, inflatable sculptures based on the figure of the 12th-century Buddha at Gal Vihara in Sri Lanka. Conceived after his father died, figures from this series are in recline, much like the famous Buddha, and painted with features that resemble the artist. This work is just as much a self-portrait as it is a representation of universal life, death, and supreme consciousness. Activated with a low-noise industrial fan, the 26-foot long, 6-foot high sculpture inflates (inhales) when switched on, and deflates (exhales) when switched off at the end of each day, alluding to the spiritual breath, or Prana, in Hindu philosophy. Prevailing among a vast range of counterpoints:  monumental and ephemeral, witty and thought-provoking, Paranirvana (Self-Portrait) rouses reflections upon existence, loss, spirituality, and much more. This work was specially commissioned by SBMA and is presented in the Museum’s historic Ludington Court.

Lewis deSoto grew up in San Bernardino, California. His Spanish and Cahuilla (Native American) heritage are often subjects of his work; as, for example, in his constructed, fictional automobiles with titles such as the “1965 DeSoto Conquest” (2004), and the “1981 GMC Cahuilla (2006).”  He studied Fine Art and Religious Studies as an undergraduate at the University of California Riverside, and received a Master of Fine Arts from Claremont Graduate School. His work has been collected and exhibited internationally throughout his 30-year career. He has been a professor at San Francisco State University since 1988.

Image credit: Lewis deSoto, Paranirvana (Self-Portrait), 1999-2015. Painted vinyl infused cloth, electric air fan, 4th in a series with color variations, Dimensions variable. Courtesy of Chandra Cerrito Contemporary.

Puja and Piety: Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist Art from the Indian Subcontinent

Share

Country:

This exhibition celebrates the complexity of South Asian representation and iconography by examining the relationship between aesthetic expression and the devotional practice, or puja, in the three native religions of the Indian subcontinent. Drawn from SBMA’s collection and augmented by loans, the exhibition presents some 160 objects of diverse medium created over the past two millennia for temples, home worship, festivals, and roadside shrines. From monumental painted temple hangings to meditation diagrams and portable pictures for pilgrims, from stone sculptures to processional bronzes and wooden chariots, from ancient terracottas to various devotional objects for domestic shrines, this exhibition aims to examine and provide contextualized insights for both classical and popular works of art.

Image credit: Himachal Pradesh, The Gods Appeal to the Great Devi for Help (detail), Folio from a Devi Mahatmya series with Sanskrit text in Devanagari script on reverse, India, Kangra, early 19th century. Color and gold on paper. Lent by Narendra and Rita Parson.

Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography

Share

Country:

Flor Garduño, Basket of Light (Canasta de luz, Sumpango, Guatemala), 1989. Gelatin silver print. SBMA, Museum purchase with funds provided by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Amory.

Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography

October 18, 2015 – March 20, 2016

The scenes of Latin American culture, politics, environments, and individuals are explored in depth in Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography. This exhibition, drawn from the permanent collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, highlights works by Latin American photographers, or artists who have adopted it as home, so that those from outside the region may look into the lives of Latin America. Through the lens of nostalgia, propaganda, a populist aesthetic, and changing perspectives, the iconic and emerging photographers illustrate the diverse but often similar spirits of countries in the region.

 

Artworks from Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, and other nations, demonstrate the experiences and traditions of diverse cultures in Latin America as the photographers explore their history, navigate the present, and look to the future. Rather than a survey exhibition of photographs from each country, the images are selected singular views exhibited to engage viewers in the dynamic complexities but also the universality of Latin American life. The photographers capture their homes for their people, but if the outsider immerses the mind in the region one gets a fascinating glimpse into Latin America. Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography reveals the sensitive and intimate relationship between photographer and home country.

 

 

VARIEDADES: A Variety Show on the Border

Share

Country:

Raquel Gutiérrez

The VARIEDADES performance series, curated by writer and performer Rubén Martínez, takes its cue from the Latin American “variety show” format and pushes the genre, combining spoken word, performance art, music, and a dash of “critical karaoke.” In honor of the Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography exhibition, the VARIEADADES crew approach the border between the U.S., Mexico, and Central America through renderings of utopia and distopia—anarchist-inspired communes, on the one hand, and the brutal violence that results from state collusion with transnational illicit markets in human and drug trafficking, on the other. Expect references to the “magonista” transnational utopia headquartered in Los Angeles at the turn of the 20th century and meditations on violence and healing in contemporary Mexico and Central America. The performance also features Rafa Esparza and

 

Raquel Gutiérrez.

VARIEDADES: A Variety Show on the Border

Share

Country:

Raquel Gutiérrez

The VARIEDADES performance series, curated by writer and performer Rubén Martínez, takes its cue from the Latin American “variety show” format and pushes the genre, combining spoken word, performance art, music, and a dash of “critical karaoke.” In honor of the Looking In, Looking Out: Latin American Photography exhibition, the VARIEADADES crew approach the border between the U.S., Mexico, and Central America through renderings of utopia and distopia—anarchist-inspired communes, on the one hand, and the brutal violence that results from state collusion with transnational illicit markets in human and drug trafficking, on the other. Expect references to the “magonista” transnational utopia headquartered in Los Angeles at the turn of the 20th century and meditations on violence and healing in contemporary Mexico and Central America. The performance also features Rafa Esparza and

 

Raquel Gutiérrez.

Interventions: Cayetano Ferrer

Share

Country:

Cayetano Ferrer, Remnant Recomposition, 2014. Casino carpet fragments and seam tape. Installation view, Swiss Institute, 2014

The foundations of Cayetano Ferrer’s sculptures and installations involve notions surrounding the remnant. Starting with a fragment—an ancient textile, a found piece of carved wood, a section of marble, or even an Art Deco-era ashtray removed from a casino lobby—the artist utilizes an array of technological methods to incorporate such objects into the larger scheme of his imagination. His work renders the obsolete and defunct both current and functional while also establishing entirely new values and contexts for objects that are most often overlooked.

In the second presentation of the Museum’s series, Interventions—whereby an artist is invited to work within the context of the Museum’s permanent collection

[1]

—Ferrer creates an installation of recent work and works created specifically for SBMA’s historic Ludington Court. Taking advantage of the empty space (the classical Greek and Roman figures from the Wright Ludington Collection have been temporarily moved off-site to prepare for SBMA’s forthcoming renovation), Ferrer installs existing and specially fabricated works that interact with not only the surrounding space but also rarely displayed objects from the Museum vaults. The objects Ferrer selected for his installation are classical stone and marble architectural fragments, including Roman columns, capitals, and other embellishments dating from the 1st Century CE, related to the well-known antiquities customarily on view in Ludington Court, but considered unworthy of permanent display. By highlighting these objects, the artist not only advances his own ongoing investigations into the concept of remnants, but also calls upon the audience, as well as the Museum, to consider them in unconventional ways.

A prominent feature of the exhibition is Remnant Recomposition (2014), a sprawling carpet comprised of spliced and re-configured pieces installed flush, or wall-to-wall, over the floor. The fragments here derive from industrially manufactured carpets from the Bellagio, Palms, and other casinos; embellished with mutated, oversized Greek and Egyptian motifs in brash colors. Placed within the context of Ludington Court, this carpet montage provokes comparisons between the realms of the Museum and the casino: not just “high” art versus “low” art, but also, more subversively, other concepts ranging from illusion to economics. Representing a massive collage or mosaic unto itself, this work also serves as a platform for the custom-designed “pedestals” or sculptures that Ferrer has created to support and re-envision the museum’s Greco-Roman fragments.

Interventions: Cayetano Ferrer critiques not just the display of but also the continued resonance of works from the “classical” era. Conversant in many forms of architecture and design, Ferrer’s work operates just as successfully in the realm of conceptual art as it does in the arenas of fantasy architecture and museum conservation. Through this project, he expands his ongoing exploration of both fact, fiction, and the limits of perception pertaining to not only the history of objects, but also to the complex history of the Museum.  As such it is a most fitting exhibition for SBMA as it enters its 75th year of exhibitions in 2016.

 

 Cayetano Ferrer: The Order of None, 2015. Working drawing for SBMA

 

Cayetano Ferrer was born in Hawaii in 1981 and currently lives in Los Angeles. He earned his BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and MFA at the University of Southern California. He was recently awarded a 2015 Art + Technology Lab grant from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The purpose of the Lab is to “nurture new work with financial and in-kind support for projects that engage emerging technology and contribute to a public dialogue about technology and culture.” Ferrer is also the recipient of the 2015 Faena Prize for the Arts provided by the Faena Art Center in Buenos Aires for his forthcoming project, Cinema Architecture. The award aims to “foster artistic experimentation, encourage crossover between disciplines, and promote new explorations of the links between art, technology, and design.”

Ferrer’s work was featured in a solo exhibition titled Composite Arcade at Chateau Shatto in Los Angeles (2014). Introducing “an environment that plays to the ambiguous yet heavily scripted sites of civic and fictional space,” the exhibition included a large video and sculpture installation and hybrid sculptures representing part fantasy and part elegy. The artist’s participation in recent group exhibitions include installations in Romancing the Fragment at the Hessel Museum of Art in New York (2015) and The St Petersburg Paradox at the Swiss Institute, New York (2014); a collaboration with artists, architects and musicians at Human Resources, Los Angeles under the moniker Downtown Light and Sound (2014); a room modeled on the spectacular pastiche of Las Vegas casino interiors for Made in LA (2012), and a billboard in Hollywood, displaying end credits for Hollywood itself.

Interventions: Cayetano Ferrer is organized by Julie Joyce, Curator of Contemporary Art, Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is a privately funded, not-for-profit institution that presents internationally recognized collections and exhibitions and a broad array of cultural and educational activities as well as travel opportunities around the world.

 

Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA.

Open Tuesday - Sunday 11 am to 5 pm, Chase Free Thursday Evenings 5 – 8 pm

805.963.4364 www.sbma.net

 

 




[1]

The first such presentation, Interventions: Brian Bress, was on view at SBMA July 15 – September 30, 2012 

Pages

Subscribe to Santa Barbara