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Centenary Press Release

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 28, 2015

 

CENTENARY OF AMERICAN ARTIST JON SCHUELER (1916-1992)

TO BE CELEBRATED THROUGHOUT 2016

Solo and group exhibitions, both in the US and in the UK, will mark the centennial of Jon Schueler’s birth.  A Jon Schueler symposium, The Sound of Sleat: Echoes, Reflections, and Transfigurations, moderated by Lindsay Blair, will take place at Salbal Mòr Ostaig, the University of the Highlands and Islands, Isle of Skye, Scotland, May 27-29.

Jon Schueler, acclaimed member of the NY School, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1916. After receiving a BA and MA from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he joined the US Army Air Force in the fall of 1941, and, as a navigator of B-17s stationed in Britain, he flew missions over France and Germany. Following World War II he attended the California School of Fine Arts from 1948-51 where he was part of the vibrant group centered around Clyfford Still, Richard Diebenkorn, Hassel Smith and David Park. With the help and encouragement of Clyfford Still, Schueler moved to New York in 1951. After solo exhibitions at the Stable Gallery (1954) and with Leo Castelli (1957), he spent six months in the North West of Scotland where his work, initially informed by Abstract Expressionism, became imbued with the force of the weather and the changing skies.

New York became his base between 1959 and his death in 1992. These years, however, were punctuated by many visits to Mallaig, Scotland where he acquired a studio overlooking over the Sound of Sleat in 1970.  The weather and light of this area became a touchstone for his preoccupation with the power of nature—whether expressed tumultuously or in subtle and hidden forms.  Numerous exhibitions in both the US and the UK took place during this period, including a solo show at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the group show Landscapes, Interior and Exterior: Avery, Rothko and Schueler at the Cleveland Museum of Art, and Jon Schueler: The Search at the University of Edinburgh's Talbot Rice Art Gallery.

Bibliography: The Sound of Sleat: A Painter's Life by Jon Schueler, Picador USA, 1999; Jon Schueler: To the North, with essays by Gerald Nordland and Richard Ingleby, Merrell, 2002

 

2016 Exhibitions in the US include:

  • Anderson Gallery, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, MA.  Jan. 21 – March 24: Mapping Memory: Jon Schueler Skyscapes, curated and catalogue by Diana Ewer

 

  • Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis, MN. Jan. 30 -- May 22: Clouds, Temporarily Visible, themed show revolving around Schueler paintings

 

  • Dean Jensen Gallery, Milwaukee, WI. Fall 2016: Jon Schueler 1916-1992: Centennial Celebration

 

  • Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, AR. August 5-October 23:  Jon Schueler: Weathering Skies, Watercolors 1967-69,  then traveling to the University of Wyoming Art Gallery, Laramie, WY, April 1-June 24, 2017

 

2016 Exhibitions in Scotland (see map of venues on www.jonschueler.com) include:

  • Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow.  January-December: Looking at Art, featuring Jon Schueler

 

  • Mallaig Heritage Centre, Mallaig, Inverness-shire.  April 4- October29: Jon Schueler : Sound of Sleat Reflections. Solo exhibition of oils commemorating Schueler's special association with Mallaig

 

  • University of Stirling : Pathfoot Building, Stirling. April 2– July 15: Speaking of the Sky: Jon Schueler

 

  • Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Isle of Skye. May 27-July 9: An Linne, The Sound of Sleat: Jon Schueler, and accompanying exhibition  of Jon Schueler Scholarship Artists 2013-2015:Takeshi Shikama, Helmut Lemke & Oliver Mezger

 

  • An Talla Solais, Ullapool, Ross-shire.  May 7-June 19: Jon Schueler: Light, Land and Sea

 

  • Rhue Art, Ullapool, Ross-shire. May 7-June 19: Jon Schueler: Distillation of Light, an exhibition to complement the An Talla Solais exhibition in the center of Ullapool

 

  • Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, Inverness.  June 25-July 31: Jon Schueler: Light, Land and Sea following the An Talla Solais showing; and travels to The Thurso Gallery, Thurso, Sutherland, August 6-September 17

 

  • Paisley Museum and Art Galleries, Paisley.  Approximately July 16 - September 11: Gesture – Expression in Modern art, with five Schuelers

 

  • Resipole Studios & Fine Art Gallery, Argyll. August 5-September 18: exhibition of Schueler oils and works on paper

 

For ongoing updates on the Jon Schueler 2016 centenary events in both the US and UK, please visit the

Jon Schueler website www.jonschueler.com and follow on:  

For Schueler paintings in public collections in the UK, see www.bbc.uk/arts/yourpaintings/

 

For supplementary material and photographs contact:

Magda Salvesen, Curator, Jon Schueler Estate

40 West 22nd Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10010

Tel. 212-929-7614   E-mail: msalvesen@jonschueler.com

 

 

 

The Art of Painting in the 21st Century Conference

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The Art of Painting in the 21st Century is an annual conference, in
its seventh year, and is geared towards nurturing dialog on
contemporary painting and the shared ideas that define current trends
in the field. Many painters work alone, an isolated process that
deprives the artist of thriving debate until the work is shown. This
year’s conference will feature the world renowned painters Richard C.
Whitten,Mark Van Proyen, Chester Arnold, Melissa Chandon and Richard
Hull.
In an intimate setting, interact with top artists in a way not
possible elsewhere. UC Davis, home to artist Roy de Forest, Roland
Peterson, Wayne Thiebaud, and Robert Arneson, was instrumental in
defining a new direction for a uniquely West Coast style. Nowhere else
in the country will the participant be able to interact and discuss
the purity of painting in one place. Meet face-to-face with
distinguished artists you might only read about; see and hear what
makes them the top of their field. No other conference lets the
participants discuss and comment on modern painting with such inspired
knowledge and insight.
The conference’s goal is to gather artists from varying communities,
allowing for open interaction between young students and professionals
in the field, fostering the strong tradition of painting and culture
in the Northern California region.

Schedule of Events
10:00 am Technical workshop by Chester Arnold.
1:00 pm Lecture by Richard Hull
2:15 pm Lecture by Richard Whitten
3:30 pm Panel discussion featuring Melissa Chandon and critic Mark Van Proyen.
7:00pm Artist Reception and Gala

Jillian Eldridge, Bright to Light to Black

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Jillian Eldridge

The Rye Creative Centre Arts Programme launches the new year with an exhibition of new paintings from long time resident Jillian Eldridge.

Migrating figures move through landscapes, distilled down to a blurred image, separated from the viewer by an over painted grid.  Images of beauty which suggest a atmosphere of contemplation. Jillian recently held her first solo show in London, "Slipping Away", at the Londonewcastle Project Space in Shoreditch.

 

11th - 29th January 2016

Monday to Friday 10am - 3pm

Private Viewing Friday January 15th 5pm - 8pm

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley

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Peter Halley, Bluff, 2007. Acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Collection of Nicholas Hunt.

For over 30 years, Peter Halley’s paintings, with their characteristic Day-Glo color and distinctive faux-stucco surfaces, have engaged in variations on the same closed set of geometric forms, designated by the artist as prisons, cells, and conduits — “icons that reflect the increasing geometricization of social space in the world in which we live.”

[1]

 

Treating space as a manifestation of social control—an idea inspired by the artist’s interest in Michel Foucault’s notion of a carceral society—Halley’s paintings provide metaphors for the constantly proliferating communication and organizational networks that have come to dominate our world. Over a career of three decades, the artist has deployed his trademark iconic forms with ever increasing intensity, resulting in works with ever more dazzling combinations of color, shape, and texture, assuring their continuing relevance in the post-millennial information age.

 

A progenitor of neo-conceptual painting, Peter Halley is widely recognized for expanding 20th-century non-objective geometric painting by tying its meaning to the social landscape, communications networks, and digital technology. Halley began exhibiting in the mid-1980s alongside such artists as Sarah Charlesworth, Jeff Koons, Haim Steinbach, and Philip Taaffe. His early works drew inspiration from the urban environment of New York City, New Wave music, and the French post-structuralist writers. The scope of Halley’s ambitions has expanded throughout the years. In the 1990s, he founded index magazine and began making site-specific installations incorporating digitally-printed wall murals. In the 2000s, he served as director of Yale’s prestigious MFA painting program and has engaged in a series of collaborative projects with designers and architects including Alessandro Mendini.

 

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halleyfeatures eight large paintings produced between 2007 and 2015. The paintings selected for the exhibition share in common a distinctive double-stack composition—with two prisons or cells, one precariously suspended above another. This work presents, as Colin Gardner suggests in his catalogue essay, “a twist on the artist’s earlier horizontal, side by side cell and conduit paintings (with their necessary sense of enclosure).” The dynamic of each painting is found in the endlessly jockeying for position of two prominent shapes, as if each is attempting to be “on top.” Together, these works project a worldview in which technology and social connections have run amuck, expressed through a geometry that has lost its claim to rationality and become senseless and absurd.

Peter Halley was born in 1953 in New York, attended Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and graduated from Yale University with a BA in Art History in 1975. He lived in New Orleans in the late 1970s, where he studied painting at the University of New Orleans, receiving his MFA in 1978. He has lived and worked in New York since 1980. In 1985, Halley had his first one-person exhibition at International with Monument, a groundbreaking East Village gallery, whose conceptually rigorous program stood in stark contrast to the then-dominant Neo-Expressionist movement. Beginning in1991, a survey of Halley’s work, organized by the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain in Bordeaux, France, toured Europe with stops at the Musée d’art contemporain, Lausanne, Switzerland, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. In 1992, the Des Moines Art Center hosted his first solo exhibition at a U.S. museum. In 2014, an extensive exhibition of his work took place at the Museé D’Art Moderne in Saint Étienne, France.

 

Halley has executed permanent installations at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and the Gallatin School at New York University. He has taught at the School of Visual Arts, New York, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Columbia University. He served as the Director of Graduate Studies in Painting and Printmaking at the Yale University School of Art from 2002 to 2011. He published index magazine from 1996 to 2005. Halley is also recognized for his critical writing. In 2013, his texts were anthologized in Peter Halley, Selected Essays, 1981-2001, published by Edgewise Press, New York.

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley is accompanied by a color illustrated catalogue with an essay by Colin Gardner, author; Ph.D. in Cinema Studies; and Professor, Integrative Studies/Critical Theory and Department Chair of the Department of Art, University of California, Santa Barbara. The exhibition is organized by Julie Joyce, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. 

 

Generous support for Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley has been provided by Martha and John Gabbert, Elaine and Michael Gray, Judith Hopkinson, and The Museum Contemporaries of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Halley, Bluff, 2007. Acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Collection of Nicholas Hunt.

 

The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is a privately funded, not-for-profit institution that presents internationally recognized collections and exhibitions and a broad array of cultural and educational activities as well as travel opportunities around the world.

 

Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA.

Open Tuesday - Sunday 11 am to 5 pm, Chase Free Thursday Evenings 5 – 8 pm

 

805.963.4364 www.sbma.net

 




[1]

http://www.peterhalley.com/

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley

Share

Country:

Peter Halley, Bluff, 2007. Acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Collection of Nicholas Hunt.

For over 30 years, Peter Halley’s paintings, with their characteristic Day-Glo color and distinctive faux-stucco surfaces, have engaged in variations on the same closed set of geometric forms, designated by the artist as prisons, cells, and conduits — “icons that reflect the increasing geometricization of social space in the world in which we live.”

[1]

 

Treating space as a manifestation of social control—an idea inspired by the artist’s interest in Michel Foucault’s notion of a carceral society—Halley’s paintings provide metaphors for the constantly proliferating communication and organizational networks that have come to dominate our world. Over a career of three decades, the artist has deployed his trademark iconic forms with ever increasing intensity, resulting in works with ever more dazzling combinations of color, shape, and texture, assuring their continuing relevance in the post-millennial information age.

 

A progenitor of neo-conceptual painting, Peter Halley is widely recognized for expanding 20th-century non-objective geometric painting by tying its meaning to the social landscape, communications networks, and digital technology. Halley began exhibiting in the mid-1980s alongside such artists as Sarah Charlesworth, Jeff Koons, Haim Steinbach, and Philip Taaffe. His early works drew inspiration from the urban environment of New York City, New Wave music, and the French post-structuralist writers. The scope of Halley’s ambitions has expanded throughout the years. In the 1990s, he founded index magazine and began making site-specific installations incorporating digitally-printed wall murals. In the 2000s, he served as director of Yale’s prestigious MFA painting program and has engaged in a series of collaborative projects with designers and architects including Alessandro Mendini.

 

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halleyfeatures eight large paintings produced between 2007 and 2015. The paintings selected for the exhibition share in common a distinctive double-stack composition—with two prisons or cells, one precariously suspended above another. This work presents, as Colin Gardner suggests in his catalogue essay, “a twist on the artist’s earlier horizontal, side by side cell and conduit paintings (with their necessary sense of enclosure).” The dynamic of each painting is found in the endlessly jockeying for position of two prominent shapes, as if each is attempting to be “on top.” Together, these works project a worldview in which technology and social connections have run amuck, expressed through a geometry that has lost its claim to rationality and become senseless and absurd.

Peter Halley was born in 1953 in New York, attended Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and graduated from Yale University with a BA in Art History in 1975. He lived in New Orleans in the late 1970s, where he studied painting at the University of New Orleans, receiving his MFA in 1978. He has lived and worked in New York since 1980. In 1985, Halley had his first one-person exhibition at International with Monument, a groundbreaking East Village gallery, whose conceptually rigorous program stood in stark contrast to the then-dominant Neo-Expressionist movement. Beginning in1991, a survey of Halley’s work, organized by the CAPC Musée d’art contemporain in Bordeaux, France, toured Europe with stops at the Musée d’art contemporain, Lausanne, Switzerland, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. In 1992, the Des Moines Art Center hosted his first solo exhibition at a U.S. museum. In 2014, an extensive exhibition of his work took place at the Museé D’Art Moderne in Saint Étienne, France.

 

Halley has executed permanent installations at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and the Gallatin School at New York University. He has taught at the School of Visual Arts, New York, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Columbia University. He served as the Director of Graduate Studies in Painting and Printmaking at the Yale University School of Art from 2002 to 2011. He published index magazine from 1996 to 2005. Halley is also recognized for his critical writing. In 2013, his texts were anthologized in Peter Halley, Selected Essays, 1981-2001, published by Edgewise Press, New York.

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley is accompanied by a color illustrated catalogue with an essay by Colin Gardner, author; Ph.D. in Cinema Studies; and Professor, Integrative Studies/Critical Theory and Department Chair of the Department of Art, University of California, Santa Barbara. The exhibition is organized by Julie Joyce, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. 

 

Generous support for Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley has been provided by Martha and John Gabbert, Elaine and Michael Gray, Judith Hopkinson, and The Museum Contemporaries of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Halley, Bluff, 2007. Acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Collection of Nicholas Hunt.

 

The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is a privately funded, not-for-profit institution that presents internationally recognized collections and exhibitions and a broad array of cultural and educational activities as well as travel opportunities around the world.

 

Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA.

Open Tuesday - Sunday 11 am to 5 pm, Chase Free Thursday Evenings 5 – 8 pm

 

805.963.4364 www.sbma.net

 




[1]

http://www.peterhalley.com/

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley

Share

Country:

 Peter Halley, Bluff, 2007. Acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Collection of Nicholas Hunt.

Using distinctive materials including Day-Glo acrylics and Roll-a-Tex, Peter Halley’s paintings present variations of geometric forms that he and others have designated as prisons, cells, and conduits. With their visual associations with modern and contemporary architecture and design, electronic and digital models, and social systems, Halley’s paintings have long predicted—and continue to serve as metaphors for—a vast range of cultural phenomena. In particular, his intense and often dazzling combination of colors and connecting shapes may be perceived as allegories for many of the physical and conceptual elements of the Information Age.

Halley is considered a progenitor of Neo-conceptual painting and rose to prominence in the 1980s alongside artists Sarah Charlesworth, Jeff Koons, Haim Steinbach, Philip Taaffe, and others. As writer Demetrio Paparoni stated, unlike these artists, Halley “was able to down the barriers [between] painting, sculpture, [and] readymades.”* Halley is also recognized for his writing—he has produced many critical texts throughout his career and served as the editor and publisher of index magazine, a publication covering indie culture, from 1996 to 2005.

 

 

Geometry of the Absurd: Recent Paintings by Peter Halley features eight iconic paintings by the artist produced from 2007 to 2015, representing his first solo museum exhibition in the Western United States. The exhibition title references the plethora of “open” societal systems that farcically disguise closed loops or, in the case of Halley’s work, confined cells. The paintings selected for the exhibition share in common a unique double-stack composition—two cells, one on top of another. This motif, appearing in Halley's work in the postmillennial period, is examined for the first time in this exhibition.

*Demetrio Paparoni, Halley’s Heresy, Peter Halley: Maintain Speed, 2000: D.A.P. (Distributed Art Publishers)

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