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TPM
Country: Brazil
City: São Paulo

Nasty is a printed and online quarterly magazine which showcases fashion, art and culture with a radical attitude. More than hundreds talented artists, fashion designers, photographers have already been published on these pages, contributing with their visions to create a unique essay on the true heart of the contemporary aesthetic.

Country: Italy
City: Rome

The best photographers, the best writers. Created by Nicole Wisniak in 1977.

Country: France
City: Paris
W25
Country: United States
City: New York
WAD

A newer mag on the block, French WAD (We Are Different) is a zine about urban culture and fashion aimed at the young, hip and alternative. It's nice and sufficiently inappropriate and trendy, screaming its motto of 'Wear different, be different' in neon yellows, muddy spray paints, funky headlines, quirky articles, all on cool paper. (In French and English)

Country: France
City: Paris

Vice is a free magazine and media conglomerate founded in Montreal, Quebec and currently based in New York City.

Vice is available in 27 countries. Editions are published in Canada, Austria, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, Japan, Spain, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Russia, Scandinavia, the United Kingdom, South Africa and the United States. It is free and supports itself primarily through advertising.

Country: Germany
City: Berlin

No other magazine defines our time like VANITY FAIR. Whether a story involves a world leader or a sporting scandal, VANITY FAIR is always fascinating, never ordinary.

Country: United Kingdom
City: London

Playboy is an American men's magazine, founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1953, by Hugh Hefner and his associates, and funded in part by a $1,000 loan from Hefner's mother. The magazine has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc., with a presence in nearly every medium. Playboy is one of the world's best known brands. In addition to the flagship magazine in the United States, special nation-specific versions of Playboy are published worldwide.

The magazine has a long history of publishing short stories by notable novelists such as Arthur C. Clarke, Ian Fleming, Vladimir Nabokov, P. G. Wodehouse, and Margaret Atwood. Playboy features monthly interviews of notable public figures, such as artists, architects, economists, composers, conductors, film directors, journalists, novelists, playwrights, religious figures, politicians, athletes and race car drivers. The magazine throughout its history has expressed a libertarian outlook on political and social issues.

Playboy's original title was to be Stag Party, but an unrelated outdoor magazine, Stag, contacted Hefner and informed him that they would protect their trademark if he were to launch his magazine with that name. Hefner and co-founder and executive vice-president Eldon Sellers met to seek a new name. Sellers, whose mother had worked for the Chicago sales office of the short-lived Playboy Automobile Company, suggested "Playboy."

The first issue, in December 1953, was undated, as Hefner was unsure there would be a second. He produced it in his Hyde Park kitchen. The first centerfold was Marilyn Monroe, although the picture used originally was taken for a calendar rather than for Playboy. The first issue sold out in weeks. Known circulation was 53,991. The cover price was 50¢. Copies of the first issue in mint to near mint condition sold for over $5,000 in 2002. The novel Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury, was also serialized in the March, April, and May 1954 issues of Playboy magazine.

The logo, the stylized profile of a rabbit wearing a tuxedo bow tie, was designed by art designer Art Paul for the second issue and has appeared ever since. A running joke in the magazine involves hiding the logo somewhere in the cover art or photograph. Hefner said he chose the rabbit for its "humorous sexual connotation," and because the image was "frisky and playful."

An urban legend started about Hefner and the Playmate of the Month because of markings on the front covers of the magazine. From 1955 to 1979 (except for a six month gap in 1976), the "P" in Playboy had stars printed in or around the letter. The legend stated that this was either a rating that Hefner gave to the Playmate according to how attractive she was, the number of times that Hefner had slept with her, or how good she was in bed. The stars, between zero and twelve, actually indicated the domestic or international advertising region for that printing.

Since reaching its peak in the 1970s, Playboy has seen a decline in circulation and cultural relevance because of competition in the field it founded — first from Penthouse, Oui (which was published as a spin-off of Playboy) and Gallery in the 1970s; later from pornographic videos; and more recently from lad mags such as Maxim, FHM, and Stuff. In response, Playboy has attempted to re-assert its hold on the 18–35 male demographic through slight changes to content and focusing on issues and personalities more appropriate to its audience — such as hip-hop artists being featured in the "Playboy Interview".

Christie Hefner, daughter of the founder Hugh Hefner, joined Playboy in 1975 and became head of the company in 1988. She announced in December 2008 that she would be stepping down from leading the company, effective in January 2009, and said that the election of Barack Obama as the next President had inspired her to give more time to charitable work, and that the decision to step down was her own. “Just as this country is embracing change in the form of new leadership, I have decided that now is the time to make changes in my own life as well,” she said.

The magazine celebrated its 50th anniversary with the January 2004 issue. Celebrations were held at Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York, and Moscow during the year to commemorate this event.

The magazine runs several annual features and ratings. One of the most popular is its annual ranking of the top "party schools" among all U.S. universities and colleges. For 2009, the magazine used five considerations: bikini, brains, campus, sex and sports in the development of its list. The top ranked party school by Playboy for 2009 was the University of Miami.

In June 2009, the magazine reduced its publication schedule to 11 issues per year, with a combined July/August issue and on 11 August 2009, London's Daily Telegraph newspaper reported that Hugh Hefner had sold his English Manor house (next door to the famous Playboy Mansion) for $18 m ($10 m less than the reported asking price) to a Daren Metropoulos and that due to significant losses in the company's value (down from $1billion in 2000 to $84mil in 2009) the Playboy publishing empire is up for sale for $300 m. In December 2009, they further reduced the publication schedule to 10 issues per year, with a combined January/February issue.

Country: Spain
City: Barcelona

The Last Magazine celebrates the next generation of art, fashion, music, and culture. Published biannually in an oversized newspaper format and on thelast-magazine.com, The Last serves as an artistic platform for a new wave of talent. The Last is also the place where an international group of young and connected readers come to find the latest and greatest in everything that interests them. Conceptual in both format and spirit, The Last abides by no preconceived template, establishing new rules with every issue. It’s a place for an unpredictable mix of people, places, and ideas. It’s all things new—at last.

Country: United States
City: New York

Pride has been the lifestyle bible of the woman of colour for nearly two decades. Pride is unique, blending multiculturalism with modern UK living. Pride is the face of black Britain.

Pride brings out the very best in its readers, who strive to be the best in every area of their very demanding and colourful lives.

The Pride woman is very aware of her cultural background and eager to retain and promote her identity. However, she is also fully integrated within the British cultural society.

The Pride woman is a well-educated, ambitious go-getter who has overcome the carelessness of her flirty freedom years. More than 50% of Pride readers have completed a degree. She is focused and responsible. Striving to be the best in both her personal and career life, she is now more confident and cultured. She is aware of her attributes and has learned to use them well. She is opinionated but always open to new ideas.

Pride has fed the spirit of the woman of colour for the best part of two decades, offering information that is important to her, such as career, health, hair and beauty, and advice on issues ranging from dealing with cultural racism to updates on the latest braid sprays – issues that are not found in any other lifestyle title.

By advertising in Pride, companies speak specifically to the woman of colour through her medium and join the celebration of all that she is. Because when a Pride woman sits down with Pride, she goes on an exciting journey of cultural self-discovery with her best friend, who understands where she is coming from and – most importantly – where she is going.

Country: United Kingdom
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
City: London

TAR Magazine is about art and aesthetics with a social awareness.

TAR magazine is a biannual published internationally each fall and spring out of New York.

It has featured work by Jonathan Lethem, Juergen Teller, Ryan McGinley, Joan Didion, and Mathew Barney.

While maintaining a fine art perspective, contributors explore contemporary, environmental, and political issues on a global scale.

Country: United States
City: New York

OYSTER is a bi-monthly, large format, high quality gloss, contemporary fashion magazine featuring the most cutting edge in fashion, photography, music, design and lifestyle.

OYSTER has a defined point of view and stands out from the myriad of sameness on magazine shelves.

OYSTER features exclusive international fashion editorial while showcasing the work of leading photographers and young up-and-coming talent, incisive investigatory stories, interviews, arts and music reviews.

OYSTER does not dictate the final word in fashion direction; rather we take the initiative to present a style that reflects a variety of contemporary ideas from an array of the most creative non-conformists.

Country: Australia
City: Surry Hills

Jane was an American magazine created to appeal to the women who grew up reading Sassy Magazine, both of which were founded by Jane Pratt. Its original target audience (pitched to advertisers) was aged 18–34, and was designed to appeal to women who are irreverent. Pratt originally intended the magazine to be named Betty, but she was voted down by everyone else involved in the making of the magazine. The magazine was launched in September 1997; the final issue was dated August 2007. The events surrounding the magazine's fold were chronicled through the experiences of two assistants on the SOAPnet series The Fashionista Diaries.

Sassy, created by Pratt in 1987, was intended to appeal to adolescent girls, but because of its sexual candor and coverage of topics other teen magazines didn't touch, such as the riot grrrl movement, its popularity exploded beyond its intended audience. When Sassy ended its New York editorial run in 1994, readers were left heartbroken and waiting for something to take its place. In September 1997, Jane Pratt's new magazine, Jane, published by the Disney-owned Fairchild Publications, hit the stands with Drew Barrymore as its maiden covergirl. (Fairchild Publications has since merged with Condé Nast Publications.)

The winner of America's Next Top Model from cycle 2 appeared in a fashion spread shot is Yoanna House respectively.

On 25 July 2005, Pratt announced that she was resigning from her position as editor in chief of Jane and would be leaving the company on 30 September 2005, exactly eight years after the magazine's debut. Insiders speculated that Pratt wanted a change in her life after she lost the twin daughters she had been carrying in April, and had been expecting in August.

In August 2005, Brandon Holley, editor in chief of Elle Girl, was named to take Pratt's place, and Christina Kelly, its managing editor, took over Elle Girl, which then folded after just 5 issues under Kelly, a veteran editor of both Sassy and Jane, as well as YM, and who was rumored to be the favorite to take over Jane because of her decades-long friendship with Jane Pratt.

An episode of the MTV animated show Daria entitled "The Lost Girls" would poke fun at Pratt's image and magazine. In the episode, an over-the-top name-dropping fashionista named Val, editor of Val magazine, visits Lawndale High after Daria wins an essay contest (Daria's English teacher had submitted the essay without her knowledge). Ultimately, Daria confronts Val about the unrealistic expectations that these fashion magazines force on young girls and about the mass-marketing of popular culture.

When Jane announced that it was ceasing publication, the magazine notified its readers that they will receive one of a number of sister magazines (Glamour, Allure or Lucky) for their remaining subscription durations. Glamour, Allure and Lucky were all Conde Nast publications that were suffering from lower circulation. Subscribers who did not wish to receive these publication in lieu of the cancelled magazine could call Conde Nast and request any of the other magazines that they published including the popular Vanity Fair.

Country: United States
City: New York

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