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Brian Trees

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These photos depict the challenges faced by people experiencing Depression and Bipolar Disorder, and sources of hope.  Too many people are lost to suicide.  All face challenges every day, including the yo-yo of mania and depression, forfeiture of independence and decision making to others, daily difficulties with getting up and pulling out of the darkness and lonliness and inability to find empathetic people who can help.  It is difficult to look at the blank, expressionless, discouraged faces of people confronted with mental illness.  At the same time, there is hope and beauty and opportunities to see the positive and rise up.

Abandoned phone booths in the desert in Arizona, showing that at times there is no way of calling for help
Monument Valley, Utah in the morning - a reminder of beauty and hope
Seabirds in Florida - soaring high and free and invoking joy
Reddish clouds after a severe thunderstorm conveying the message that there is solace and respite after the worst
Solitary tree. Showing how alone people with mental illness feel, looking into the darkness

Mattie Egerter

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I was so giddy to capture this scene!! I’ve never seen a heron catch anything besides fish, but here he got a vole/rodent Getting this shot made me love Cattus Island and I can’t wait to go back!
I love seeing wood ducks! All their colors just scream fall and I can’t wait to see more of them!
Found this cutie in Florida, i have never seen monkeys in person, so I'm now in love!
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Welcome to my adventure!!

I'm a Jersey shore native, discovering all the natural beauty around me. I love the chase of animal photography and discovering new birds and anything else that intrigues me.

I can't wait to see some gorgeous animals and destinations; I'm excited to share my photographic journey with you!

Max Wolf

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Bief is a call to reach and touch; Bief is a representation of lamentation and loneliness. The inspiration for this image is that of the solitude which is forced upon our existences in light of the ongoing pandemic. My embattlement with severe long-term complications of coronavirus have resulted in significant deposits of agony, emotionally and physically; the universal pain that embattles our world today is one that would be so easily solved in any other predicament with a resolving physical embrace.

Bief is a call to reach and touch; Bief is a representation of lamentation and loneliness. The inspiration for this image is that of the solitude which is forced upon our existences in light of the ongoing pandemic. My embattlement with severe long-term complications of coronavirus have resulted in significant deposits of agony, emotionally and physically; the universal pain that embattles our world today is one that would be so easily solved in any other predicament with a resolving physical embrace.
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Max Wolf — in the eyes of John Slye, the journalist that interviewed Wolf on their artistic process last year — “recalibrated fashion portraiture’s traditional framing” by developing a unique and emerging perspective on visual artistry, interjecting tones of drama and humanity in their intimate, neoclassic portraiture as well as their radical abstract forays. Wolf, based out of Chicago, Illinois and New York, New York, has been published internationally with exhibitions and publications based out of New York, Milan, Los Angeles, Barcelona, Istanbul, Tehran, Miami, San Jose, Oakland, Doncaster, Orlando and Tampa, provoking audiences with works that “[punch] far above their weight [in creativity]. Wolf has been curated by the editorial team at Vogue Italia to their online Photo Vogue platform on nineteen occasions, utilizing intriguing visual storytelling that maintains the polished detail-attentive aesthetic of the editorial giant. Wolf has been recognized generously by Visual Supply Co. (VSCO), most recently having been recognized in the form of an interview detailing and demonstrating their artistic process; Wolf attached insight and interview commentary to depictions of juxtaposing paired imagery that were published in a previous editorial publication by Kendal Kulley, Wolf having a history of curations to a plethora of select collections by the staff at VSCO. Wolf’s recent virtual exhibition, Alchemy, was subsequently picked up by Art Upon Contemporary, Artheme Gallery and MoCA Digital, as their visual works tackling the complex and shrouded waves of solidarity and grief in the onset of the coronavirus pandemic have been picked up by several platforms, including that of the COVID Art Museum detailed in editorials for VICE, MSN, The National, VICE Spain, Print Magazine and Playground Magazine. Wolf has been inducted into the digital archive of Iconic Artist, demonstrating the imminence of their impact on the main stage of thought-provoking contemporary photography.

Briarwood Bohemian

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I took this photo in 2017, while walking through the Upper East Side of Manhattan. It was rainy and gloomy that day. Playing in the sidewalk puddles, I came across some ordinary apartment buildings. Standing back to look at them, their symmetry grabbed my eye and I began shooting photos; they were anything but ordinary to me now.

A black and white photograph showing three apartment buildings in Manhattan. The one in the center is the main focus of the photograph.
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I'm a New York City based artist, photographer and writer. I'm passionate about art sustainability and community engagement. 

Alina Oswald

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I’ve lost track of time. The coronavirus pandemic has not only been the mark of 2020, a year to remember for sure, but has marked us, as individuals, and in so many ways. These days it’s like living in a loop. There’s no weekend, no week day. There’s checking in with family and friends, scrubbing hands with soap and water, watching (mostly local) press conferences, while holding my breath for the latest updates, which never seem to look encouraging, rather, quite the opposite. There's taking time putting on the mask, to make sure I carry an additional mask with me, in case the elastic band of the one I wear breaks from having to wear the mask for too long. I have to, because there are not that many masks to be found.

This has been a devastating year that has depleted so many of us of so many basic needs--homes, lives, health, livelihoods. This kind of thick, deep, darkness brings despair, depression, and hopelessness. What's left? 

“State of Mind” - a Covid-19 self-portrait in black and white, part of #photographersinisolation body of work
A black-and-white Covid-19 self-portrait. Title, “I’ll Cover You,” is inspired by a song from RENT the musical. Part of #photographersinisolation body of work
Like the mask, used and abused during this coronavirus year, we, too, oftentimes feel…discarded.
Invisible Shackles keeping us imprisoned in a dark and dangerous space.
Immersed in such a devastating darkness, even the idea of hope disappears. For some, there is no "next move" no other choice but to let go, and give ourselves to that darkness. Forever.

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